Mount Everest

The Everest region is located in the northeast of Nepal. The 10-day walk through the middle hills of Solu to the higher altitudes of Khumbu to the base of Sagarmatha, or Mt. Everest, the world’s highest peak, is an opportunity to observe
and participate in the daily life of the legendary Sherpa people. The prime attraction – the 8,848 m peak of Mt. Everest – lies in Sagarmatha National Park, which is also home to two other eight thousanders – Lhotse and Cho Oyu – besides several other prominent peaks above 6,000 m.
Designated as a World Heritage Site in 1979, much of the 1,148 sq. km park lies above 3,000 m. The park is composed of rugged terrain with deep gorges, glaciers and huge rocks. The vegetation in the park changes from pine, hemlock, fir, juniper, birch, rhododendron and shrubs to alpine plants and then to bare rock and snow. It is home to the ghoral, tahr, serow and musk deer as well as the impeyan pheasant, blood pheasant, red-billed chough and the yellow-billed chough.
The trail to Everest also begins at Lukla, the airport at 2,850 m. The trail climbs up the Dudhkoshi River Valley, and the following day brings you to the legendary Sherpa village of Namche Bazaar in the Khumbu (3,500 m), which is the staging point for expeditions to Everest and other peaks in the area. Above Namche lie the traditional villages Khunde and Khumjung. Khumjung which is the largest village in the Khumbu lies at the foot of the sacred peak Khumbila. The Khunde Hospital, maintained by Himalayan Trust, and Khumjung School, the original Hillary School set up in 1960, lie here.
of Across the canyon from Khunde, perched on a high ridge, is the Tengboche Monastery, the leading Buddhist center in the Khumbu. The monastery rests amid stunning views of Everest, Lhotse and Ama Dablam. Pines, azaleas and colorful mountain rhododendrons ring the attractive monastery. There are rest houses, lodges and camping sites here.From Tengboche you can continue on to Pheriche, Kala Pattar and the hamlet of Gorakshep.  From here, the site of Everest Base Camp is easily accessible, as is the summit of Kala Pattar (5,545 m), from which much of Mt. Everest is clearly visible. However, you must take time to properly acclimatize as the altitude gains are rapid.

Source: http://welcomenepal.com/promotional/tourist-destination/everest-region-2/

Rafting in Nepal

When it comes to white water rafting and kayaking, Nepal has the best on offer in the world. Nepal has rivers to cover every level of white water activity after the monsoon offers the most adrenaline packed rivers to all adventure seekers. This mountainous country spoils the adventure for choice when it comes to white water. Not only is rafting a great action adventure holiday, but it’s a great way to discover the beauty of Nepal. The rivers all originate high up in the Himalaya and snake there way downwards through some of the most spectacular scenery in the world. Not only do you get to see first hand Nepal’s nature but also you get to experience her ancient and unique culture as you raft through remote villages and farm land. Nepal’s selection of rivers covers a range of grades which accommodate everything from the ultimate adrenaline adventure, an action packed river ride to a fun family holiday.
Some of the remote rivers offer long rafting trips which incorporate some trekking. These kinds of trips are truly trips of a life time as you have to bring with you everything you need and be totally self reliant and sufficient. These rivers churn out their courses through some of the most pristine wilderness and isolated villages that Nepal has to offer.
Rafting is not the only option here. All of Nepal’s rives can be kayaked. The range of rivers in Nepal covers experienced to novice kayakers. For the first time kayaker, you can take time out and do a clinic to learn kayaking. These clinics cover everything form safety and technique to river craft. Can you imagine a better way to discover Nepal than by floating down its majestic rivers in your own kayak? What better way to get up close and personal with this stunning country?
In Nepal you will truly find some of the world’s most outstanding river journeys. As rafting and kayaking is an activity that needs to be arranged through our company, why not let Sarita Holidays Travels & Tours organize your trip for you? We guarantee a fun and adventure packed trip guided by the highest standard guides with the best equipment.

Latest Photo of Rampur Palpa



Immigration officials caught on camera accepting bribe

 The Commission for the Investigation of Abuse of Authority on Tuesday arrested five Immigration officials as they were caught on camera accepting bribe.
The anti-graft body arrested the officials at the Immigration Department with video footage showing the officials taking bribe from the service seekers.
Section Officers Surya Prasad Dahal and Devarsi Sapkota, non-gazette officers Pradip Prasad Lamichhane and Bishwa Raj Kharel and office assistant Jaya Narayan Napit have been arrested.

Norway's Prime Minister works as secret taxi driver - video

IMAGINE jumping in a taxi and finding the Prime Minister at the wheel. This is what several Norwegians discovered when their country's leader, Jens Stoltenberg, went undercover as a taxi driver.
In a bid to find out the real concerns of voters ahead of Norway's general election on 9 September, Stoltenberg wore an Oslo Taxi uniform for an afternoon and picked up passengers in a black Mercedes.
"It's important for me to hear what people really think. If there's one place where people say what they think, it's in the taxi," Stoltenberg said in a video posted on YouTube.


The stunt, which was carried out in June, was filmed by a hidden camera to record reactions from the passengers, including one who remarked: "From this angle, you really look like the Prime Minister."
Passengers, who were not charged for their journeys, discussed issues ranging from education and oil policy to the state of Stoltenberg's driving skills.
One passenger said the "driving is not exactly the best I've seen" after the Prime Minister, who had not driven in eight years, brought the automatic car to a sudden halt.
Asked by the tabloid Verdens Gang if he would become a taxi driver if he lost the elections, Stoltenberg said: "I think that the country and Norwegian taxi passengers are better served if I were a Prime Minister and not a taxi driver."
According to the latest opinion polls, Stoltenberg's ruling centre-left coalition appears likely to lose. But he did steer one voter in his party's direction. While climbing out of the taxi, an elderly male passenger told him: "This has been nice ... I will vote Labour Party."


Read more: http://www.theweek.co.uk/europe/54571/norways-prime-minister-works-secret-taxi-driver-video#ixzz2boiYRq5d

Rara Lake: Heaven on Earth is not just a cliche, after Rara

Kathmandu Valley

Kathmandu Valley comprises the three ancient cities of Kathmandu, Patan and Bhaktapur, which were once independent states ruled by the Malla kings from the 12th to the 18th centuries. The three cities house seven UNESCO World Heritage shrines which are together listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site (Culture). The valley is also home to hundreds of other exquisite monuments, sculptures, artistic temples and magnificent art – reminders of the golden era in Nepal’s architecture.
Legend has it that the valley was was once a primordial lake ringed by verdant mountains.  In this pristine lake lived giant serpents until one fine day, saint Manjushree, the Bodhisatva, raised a mighty sword and in one fell swoop, cut open the side of a mountain at a place now known as Chobar. The voluminous waters of the lake gushed out, leaving behind a fertile valley capable of supporting large urban settlements over the millennia. The Gopala and Kirati dynasties were the earliest rulers here followed by the Licchavi (300-879 A.D.), under whom flourished trade and crafts.
But the valley’s remarkable cities with their ornate palaces, the superbly crafted pagodas and the monumental stupas are testimony of the artistic genius of the Newar craftsmen, the original inhabitants of the valley, whose skills were championed by the Malla kings and appreciated even by the Mongol rulers of 18th century China.


source http://welcomenepal.com/promotional/tourist-destination/around-kathmandu/

nepali Culture

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Customs and traditions differ from one part of Nepal to another. A conglomeration lies in capital city Kathmandu where cultures are blending to form a national identity. Kathmandu Valley has served as the country’s cultural metropolis since the unification of Nepal in the 18th Century.A prominent factor in a Nepali’s everyday life is religion. Adding color to the lives of Nepalis are festivals the year round which they celebrate with much pomp and joy. Food plays an important role in the celebration of these festivals.







Religion:

Nepal was declared a secular country by the Parliament on May 18, 2006. Religions practiced in Nepal are: Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, Jainism, Sikhism, Bon, ancestor worship and animism. The majority of Nepalis are either Hindus or Buddhism. The two have co-existed in harmony through centuries.
Buddha is widely worshipped by both Buddhists and Hindus of Nepal. The five Dhyani Buddhas; Vairochana, Akshobhaya, Rathasambhava, Amitabha and Amoghasiddhi, represent the five basic elements: earth, fire, water, air and ether. Buddhist philosophy conceives these deities to be the manifestations of Sunya or absolute void. Mahakaala and Bajrayogini are Vajrayana Buddhist deities worshipped by Hindus as well.
Hindu Nepalis worship the ancient Vedic gods. Bramha the Creator, Vishnu the Preserver and Shiva the Destroyer, are worshipped as the Supreme Hindu Trinity. People pray to the Shiva Linga or the phallic symbol of Lord Shiva in most Shiva temples. Shakti, the dynamic element in the female counterpart of Shiva, is highly revered and feared. Mahadevi, Mahakali, Bhagabati, Ishwari are some of the names given. Kumari, the Virgin Goddess, also represents Shakti.Other popular deities are Ganesh for luck, Saraswati for knowledge, Lakshmi for wealth and Hanuman for protection. Krishna, believed to be the human incarnation of Lord Vishnu is also worshipped widely. Hindu holy scripts Bhagawat Gita, Ramayan and Mahabharat are widely read in Nepal. Vedas, Upanishads and other holy scriptures are read by well learned Brahmin Pundits during special occasions.


Customs:

The diversity in Nepal in terms of ethnicity again makes room for various sets of customs. Most of these customs go back to the Hindu, Buddhist or other religious traditions. Among them, the rules of marriage are particularly interesting. Traditional marriages call for deals arranged by parents after the boy or girl come of age.
Nepalis do not eat beef. There are several reasons for this, one being that the Hindus worship cow. Cow is also the national animal of Nepal. Another interesting concept among Nepalis is division of pure and impure. “Jutho” referring to food or material touched by another’s mouth directly or indirectly, is considered impure by Nepalis. Nepalis consider cow dung to be pure for cleansing purposes. During menstruation women are considered impure and hence, are kept in seclusion until their fourth day purification bath.Nepal is a patriarchal society. Men usually go out to work while women are homemakers. However, in cities, roles can differ. Most Nepalis abide by the caste system in living habits and marriage. Rural Nepal is mostly agrarian, while some aspects of urban life carry glitz and glamour of the ultra-modern world.


Food:

Nepal does not have a distinct cooking style. However, food habits differ depending on the region. Nepali food has been influenced by Indian and Tibetan styles of cooking. Authentic Nepali taste is found in Newari and Thakai cuisines. Most Nepalis do not use cutlery but eat with their right hand.The regular Nepali meal is dal (lentil soup), bhat (boiled rice) and tarkari (curried vegetables), often accompanied by achar (pickle). Curried meat is very popular, but is saved for special occasions, as it is relatively more expensive. Momos (steamed or fried dumplings) deserve a mention as one of the most popular snack among Nepalis. Rotis (flat bread) and dhedo (boiled flour) also make meals in some homes.


Source http://welcomenepal.com/promotional/know-nepal/culture/